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Computer Science

Computer Science is above all relevant to the modern and changing world of Computing. Through a practical and theoretical exploration of the subject, students will gain an understanding of how to logically decompose problems in computational terms and devise practical solutions to meet them. From Key Stage 3 through to Key Stage 5, students will analyse problems through practical experience, and develop their abilities to think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically. They will improve their mathematical skills, develop their abilities to articulate individual social, moral, cultural, legal and ethical arguments, and see the risks associated with digital technology.

Staffing

Head of Department

Mr G Dale

Teachers

Mr G Dale, Mr K Cameron

Prefects

Connor Phillips

Jayden Vicarey

Rachel Sheppard

Ambassadors

Zoe Tangen

Natasha Chisvo

Ezri Spring

Kyra Johnson

Maddie Hall

Lily Young

Ruby Knight

Immi Fox

Ifeyemi Ifekoya

Key Stage 3

Content

At Key Stage 3, the students are given the opportunity to experience a wide range of ICT and computing skills and subjects:

Year 7

Term 1: Basic Computing and ICT skills development

Term 2 & 3: Art and Animation functional skills and Independent Project

Term 4 & 5: Video and Audio editing skills development and Group Project

Term 6: Logical and visual programming through games development and 3 Independent Projects

Year 8

Term 1: Planning and designing a personal website

Terms 2 & 3: Building and designing your personal website using the internet languages of HTML and CSS

Term 4: Adding interaction to your website using the internet language of Javascript

Terms 5 & 6: ICT Functions skills development and end of KS3 assessment

Assessment and feedback 

Students are initially Baseline tested in Year 7 to assess their experience to date in the subject.

Other assessment is provided during and at the end of each project or topic. The students will receive this both formally and verbally as a group or individually. All work produced has to be uploaded to Google Classroom for final feedback and assessment at the end of each project. Late submissions will receive appropriate grading penalties.

Key Stage 4

Content 

At the end of the course, students will complete the following elements:

  • Computer systems (exam 40%)
  • Computational thinking, algorithms & programming (exam 40%)
  • Programming project (controlled assessment 20%)

This course will build on the knowledge and understanding that students have gained through their introduction to Computer Science at Key Stage 3. Students are encouraged to explore and develop their computing skills through both theoretical and practical investigation.  Independent study skills are one of the key components to further aid development in this subject, and students are expected to undertake research, and problem solving exercises as part of this.

Assessment and feedback 

Year 9

Tracking progress

  • Students will be able to track their progress over the assignments and work set every two terms via a summary of their work to-date which will be emailed to individual students.

Assessments

  • Students are given projects which explore methods of breaking down problems, writing algorithms and program code. Regular feedback is given on progress. Formal assessments on progress within the project work are made termly. This helps students to progress and develop at their own pace.

Marking

  • Feedback on assignments given will be returned via the Google Classroom within two weeks

Year 10

Tracking progress

  • At the beginning of the course, students are provided with a copy of the syllabus specification and most recent set of grade boundaries as published by the exam board.
  • Students will be able to track their progress over the assignments and work set every term via a summary of their work to-date which will be emailed to individual students.

Assessments

  • Students will commence the theory element of the course which is divided into discrete topics. Students are assessed on their learning and understanding at the end of each topic.
  • Students also complete practical work in the form of problems to be solved. Feedback is given during and at the end of the project in the form of written advice and an overall grade.
  • There will be a formal end of year exam covering the topics studied to-date

Marking

  • Feedback on assignments and tests will be returned via the Google classroom within two weeks
  • Feedback on the end of year exam will be given to students in the form of a one-to-one discussion.

Year 11

Tracking progress

  • At the beginning of the course, students are provided with a copy of the syllabus specification and most recent set of grade boundaries as published by the exam board.
  • Students will be able to track their progress over the assignments and work set every two terms via a summary of their work to-date which will be emailed to individual students.

Assessments

  • Students will complete and review the theory elements of the course. Assessment will be made in the form of end of topic and revision tests.
  • Students will complete several practice coursework tasks on which they will receive feedback.
  • Students will complete the controlled assessment tasks at the end of which they will be graded on what they have completed after 20 hours. This project forms part of the GCSE specification.

Marking

  • Feedback on assignments and tests will be returned via the Google Classroom within two weeks
  • Feedback on the end of year exam will be given to students in the form of a one-to-one discussion.

Specification 

Please click here for the GCSE OCR Computer Science specification

A Level

Content 

Students will complete the following elements:

  • Computer systems (exam 40%)
  • Computational thinking, algorithms & programming (exam 40%)
  • Programming project (20%)

Computer Science is a practical subject offering students the opportunity to apply the academic principles learned in the classroom to real world systems. Students will explore a theoretical concept and then create a practical application or program based on that learning. It is a very creative subject combining innovation, invention and excitement, with great value placed in developing computational thinking skills.

Assessment and feedback 

Tracking progress

At the beginning of the course students are provided with a copy of the syllabus specification and most recent set of grade boundaries as published by the exam board. There will be a termly scheme of work provided to students setting out the topics that are to be covered, students are encouraged to review the topics in the text book ahead of lessons.

Assessment

  • Students will study the theory elements of the course which is divided into discrete topics. Students are assessed on their learning and understanding at the end of each topic.
  • Following on from the theory, students also complete practical work in the form of applying their theoretical understanding to a practical problem. Feedback is given during and at the end of each project in the form of written advice on their understanding of the topic, and their development of programming skills.

Marking

  • Results of end of topic tests will be returned to students within two weeks
  • Feedback on assignments given will be returned via the Google Classroom within two weeks

Mark schemes

  • Click here for the specimen mark-scheme for H446 - 01 Computer Systems
  • Click here for the specimen mark-scheme for H446-02 Computational thinking, algorithms & programming 
  • Click here for the OCR guide for H446-03 Programming project

Specification 

Please click here for the OCR A Level Computer Science specification

Exam Support

Advice

Successful students in Computer Science are those who are willing to develop their organisational ability and academic curiosity. Most will spend at least two hours per week practising their programming skills, pursuing research, and monitoring their progress. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the theoretical aspects of the course when they apply them in a practical context. As an analogy; learning a musical instrument requires practice -  getting better at programming is like learning an instrument!

Useful external link

www.mrfraser.org

Careers

Alumni 

Emma Kingston

Tyler Sullivan