Close

Our School App Stay connected on the go...

Open
Key Information
Select Language
Menu

Subject Pages

Film Studies

Film Studies provides students with the opportunity to learn more about one of the main cultural innovations of the 20th century and a major art form of the last hundred years.

Students will study how to analyse the micro elements which contribute to meaning in narrative as well as the message and values that can be conveyed through the medium.  We will look at mainstream American film from the past and the present, as well as a range of recent and contemporary British films, American independent films and global films.  Students will be able to consider a range of responses from the emotional to the reflective in their essay writing.

Covering a diverse range of films from several different contexts is designed to give students the opportunity to apply their knowledge and understanding of how films are constructed to their own filmmaking and screenwriting, thus combining strong intellectual skills with creative talent.

Staffing

Head of Department

Mrs Cowley

Prefects

Daisy Carr

Nikki Tangen​

A Level

Content 

Students will study Core Study Areas for all films in the exam for components 1 & 2:

  • The key elements of film form
  • Meaning and response
  • The contexts of film

The following Specialist Study Areas will be the focus in the exam for components 1 & 2:

  • Spectatorship
  • Narrative
  • Ideology
  • Auteur
  • Critical Debates
  • Filmmakers’ Theories

For component 3 – Coursework - ‘Production’ students will produce either a short film (4–5 minutes)  or a screenplay for a short film (1600–1800 words) plus a digitally photographed storyboard of a key section from the screenplay and an evaluative analysis for both options (1600–1800 words)

Assessment and feedback 

For Components 1 & 2, the following Assessment Objectives apply:

AO1 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of elements of film

AO2 Apply knowledge and understanding of elements of film to:

  • Analyse and compare films, including through the use of critical approaches
  • Evaluate the significance of critical approaches
  • Analyse and evaluate own work in relation to other professionally produced work

For Component 3, the following Assessment Objectives apply:

AO2 Apply knowledge and understanding of elements of film to:

  • Analyse and compare films, including through the use of critical approaches
  • Evaluate the significance of critical approaches
  • Analyse and evaluate own work in relation to other professionally produced work

AO3 Apply knowledge and understanding of elements of film to the production of a film or screenplay

Assessment

Students will be doing essays throughout the course, as well as presentations and discussion activities in the lessons.  They will have many opportunities to peer mark work and to read model responses. 

Students will have access to examples of screenplays, as well as short films made by other students, and they will be encouraged to engage with the practical component of the course from the very start.

Feedback

Essays will be returned to students within two weeks.  Any practical work will be assessed not only by the class teacher but feedback will be provided by a professional filmmaker.

Specification

Click here for the WJEC Eduqas GCE A Level Film Studies

Exam Support

Advice

An enthusiasm for film and an ability to be open to different experiences and interpretations is essential.

Past papers

As this is the first year of the new specification, there are no past papers available although there is a selection of sample papers available for teaching for this initial year.

Useful external links

Click here to visit the sample assessment materials for Film Studies A Level from the WJEC Eduqas website

Extra-curricular

Trips and visits

We will visit the British Film Institute, hopefully to attend one of their educational courses.

A professional filmmaker will be running a few sessions in school in which he will discuss how sound, cinematography, editing, mise-en-scene, and performance – key micro elements – contribute to the creation of meanings.